CALLIDE OXYFUEL project

A LEGACY FOR A CLEANER ENERGY FUTURE

The Callide Oxyfuel Project in Central Queensland, Australia, is a world-first project, successfully demonstrating how oxyfuel and carbon capture technology can be applied to existing power stations to generate electricity from coal with low emissions.

Following the end of its demonstration phase in March 2015, the Callide Oxyfuel leaves a legacy that oxyfuel combustion, linked with carbon capture and storage, is a realistic option for a cleaner energy future.

The Callide Oxyfuel Project has helped create a pathway for the design and construction of large scale oxy-combustion plants with carbon capture. When linked with geological storage, this technology has the potential to reduce CO2 emissions from coal fired power stations by up to 90%.

Callide Oxyfuel Project – Lessons Learned.

In conjunction with the Global CCS Institute, the Callide Oxyfuel Project has released a paper that describes in detail key technical aspects of the plant, project milestones and lessons learned. Click here to download.

THE US AND CHINA ACCOUNT FOR OVER ONE THIRD OF GLOBAL GREENHOUSE EMISSIONS. IMAGINE IF WE COULD EXPORT WHAT WE HAVE DEVELOPED AT CALLIDE TO THESE TWO COUNTRIES ALONE?

Dr Chris Spero, Project Director, Callide Oxyfuel Project.

 

A STEP towards commercial application

We successfully tested oxyfuel and carbon capture technology under ‘live’ power station conditions for more than two years, at 30 megawatts of electricity generation. Our results show the technology is ready to be applied to a full scale, commercial power station.

ACHIEVED!

  • 10,200 hours of generation in oxyfuel combustion mode
  • 5,600 hours of carbon capture plant industrial operation

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FOR SALE

Oxyfuel carbon capture technology, when linked with geological carbon storage, can reduce your coal-fired power station CO2 emissions by up to 90%.

The technology demonstrated at the Callide Oxyfuel Project can now be applied to existing power stations, as ‘bolt-on’ technology or built into new power station in the future.