CARBON CAPTURE

CONTAINING THE MAIN CAUSE OF CLIMATE CHANGE

Oxyfuel combustion is considered to be one of the major technologies for carbon capture in power plants. Capturing carbon is the first step in a suite of technologies called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

Using oxyfuel technology (link to oxyfuel page), coal is combusted in a boiler using oxygen and recycled exhaust gases, and a concentrated stream of CO2 is produced.

The Callide Oxyfuel Project operated in oxy-firing mode between June 2012 and March 2015. During this time, the project achieved:

  • 10,200 hours of operating in oxyfuel combustion mode; and
  • 5,600 hours of industrial operation of the carbon capture plant.

When linked with geological carbon storage, this technology has the potential to reduce CO2 emissions from coal fired power stations by around 90%, providing a realistic technology option for low emission electricity generation.



A Lessons Learnt paper was written towards the end of the demonstration phase. Download it here.

Did you know?


AFTER THE COAL IS COMBUSTED USING OXYFUEL TECHNOLOGY, THE EXHAUST GAS IS ALMOST 90% PURE CARBON DIOXIDE.

IN THE PAST 10 YEARS, THIS TECHNOLOGY WENT THROUGH A RAPID DEVELOPMENT AND IS NOW FULLY RECOGNISED AS AN IMPORTANT OPTION FOR CAPTURING CO2 FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS.

John Gale, General Manager, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme

 

Carbon storage is not a new concept. The oil and gas industries have been successfully injecting carbon dioxide underground for almost 50 years.