OXYFUEL TECHNOLOGY

THE POWER TO CREATE A CLEANER FUTURE

Oxyfuel technology involves burning coal in a mixture of pure oxygen and recycled flue gases, instead of regular air.

This produces a concentrated stream of carbon dioxide (CO2) that can be captured and stored.

The flue gas product from the Oxyfuel boiler is then processed in the CO2 Purification Unit (CPU) which:

1) removes other pollutants such as Oxides of Sulfur (SOx) and Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx); and

2) compresses and separates the CO2 from inert gases such as oxygen and nitrogen.

The compressed and purified CO2 is suitable for transportation, injection and geological storage, or commercial industrial applications.


The Callide A Power Station in Central Queensland, Australia, was the first power station in the world to be retrofitted with oxyfuel carbon capture technology.

The CO2 captured by the oxyfuel process is no longer a gas but a liquid, frozen to minus 30┬░C.

TOWARDS COMMERCIAL APPLICATION

An industrial-scale demonstration of oxyfuel combustion and carbon capture technology was successfully completed at the Callide A Power Station, paving the way for commercial application of the technology.

Oxyfuel technology is now available to build into commercial scale, capture-ready power plants.

The Callide Oxyfuel Project is an important step towards demonstrating practical and adaptable technology to help tackle climate change.

Whilst oxyfuel technology can be applied as a new-build, it can also be fitted to existing power stations, which means potentially a quicker path to low-emission electricity generation from coal.

Dr Chris Spero, Project Director, Callide Oxyfuel Project.

 

Global Emission Outputs

Towards commercial application

An industrial-scale demonstration of oxyfuel combustion and carbon capture technology was successfully completed at the Callide A Power Station. Oxyfuel technology is now available to build into commercial scale, capture-ready power plants.

The Callide Oxyfuel Project is an important step towards demonstrating practical and adaptable technology to help tackle climate change.

 HOT Stuff

Combusting coal in pure oxygen would cause the boiler to get so hot it would melt – that is why we need to add recycled exhaust gases. This keeps the furnace temperature within an allowable range.

The basic elements in the Callide project have all been tried and tested elsewhere. Oxyfuel combustion has been used in different industries and the storage of CO2 underground was pioneered by the oil and gas industry in the late 1970s.